THE AMATEUR WORD NERD QUIZ: Where does ‘quarantine’ come from?

By Barbara McAllister Where does the word “quarantine” come from? Is it… A. A type of beverage B. The bubonic plague C. A place in…

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The Amateur Word Nerd: Don’t get poked through a loophole

By Barbara MacAllister Word of the Day: Loopholes With tax season here, you may hear about avoiding expenses by means of a loophole in the…

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The Amateur Word Nerd Quiz: Does your pet pronk?

By Barbara MacAllister If your pet pronks, it: a) Jumps off the ground with all four feet at once b) Follows you everywhere c) Makes…

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The Amateur Word Nerd: Do you live in the king’s ‘arms’?

By Barbara MacAllister Word of the Day: Arms You know arms as part of anatomy or as guns, but did you ever wonder why some…

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THE AMATEUR WORD NERD: Have some kedgeree and eat like royalty

By Barbara MacAllister Word of the Day: Kedgeree Sharp-eyed fans of “Downton Abbey” know the first dish served to the Earl of Grantham in Episode…

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The Amateur Word Nerd: Is Clement in the forcast?

By Barbrara McAllister Word of the Day: Clement The word clement comes from the Latin clemens, meaning calm or mild. Weather can be clement or…

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WORD NERDS QUIZ: What is an oxymoron?

By Barbara McAllister What does oxymoron mean? Is it… A. Living dead B. Virtual reality C. Goodbye reception The correct answer is: All of the…

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THE AMATEUR WORD NERD: Ever try to herd a clowder?

By Barbara McAllister Word of the Day: Clowder A clowder is the name for a cluster of cats. A group of cats can also be…

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THE AMATEUR WORD NERD: Stressed? Take a forest bath

By Barbara McAllister Word of the Day: Forest bathing Forest bathing is a concept becoming popular in America. It involves contemplative walks through the woods…

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THE AMATEUR WORD NERD: ‘Exeunt’ and a Shakespeare unsolved mystery

By Barbara McAllister WORD OF THE DAY: Exeunt If you read plays, you might see the stage direction, “exeunt.” Exeunt is Latin for “they go…

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